Tag Archives: Cambridgeshire

Light and Space

Some of the earliest and most famous photographs of Ely Cathedral are those of Frederick H. Evans. He was profoundly dedicated to pure photography, not altering the printing of negatives for aesthetic effects; rather using his ability to capture an image at the most telling moment of light and shadow. In keeping, these are ACROS film simulation jpegs shot with my FujiFilm X-PRO2 with no further processing.

The spaces inside cathedrals are vast and an intrinsic part of both their architectural design and function. Capturing them in a two dimensional medium is immensly challenging, space is hard to see, and I find that the third dimension is hinted at most strongly by light.

Lode Water Mill

I first tried to photograph the interior of this wonderful old water mill 10 years ago. At that time, a 50mm f/1.4 lens at maximum aperture just about let enough light in to enable a few handheld shots without excessive noise. Now, low noise sensors and image stabilisation mean so much more is feasible, including wide angle.

The project was shot with a Fujifilm X-T3 and Acros film simulation using ambient light and minimal post processing. My aim being to make use of my time exploring the light inside the old mill with my camera, rather than sat at a computer with Lightroom.

The present mill dates from the 18th century and is now in the care of the National Trust and has been restored to full working order.